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Our Research Catalogue contains grants and outputs data up until April/May 2014.

Moving in My World: An Investigation into Young People's Embodiment and its Impact on Participation in Physical Activity

Grant reference: RES-061-25-0382

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Impact Report details

Moving in My World: An Investigation into Young People's Embodiment and its Impact on Participation in Physical Activity
To cite this output: Azzarito, L, (2012) Moving in my World: An Investigation into Young People’s Embodiment and its Impact on Participation in Physical Activity ESRC Impact Report, RES-061-25-0382. Swindon: ESRC
English

Primary contributor

Author Laura Azzarito

Impacts

All of the objectives that this visual research project aimed to achieve, from data collection to data analysis and photo exhibitions in the researched community, were accomplished. It is difficult, at this point, to accurately evaluate the scientific impact of this research. However, it can be noted that the findings from this research project and the innovative visual participatory methodology used have made a significant contribution to PE pedagogy and physical culture studies, and across the disciplines. The articles and book chapters listed in the following section, published across disciplines, demonstrate the high quality of the project delivery and results of this research. In particular, as a result of this research, the book entitled Pedagogies, Physical Culture and Visual Methods is at the moment in preparation under contract with Routledge. This edited book includes chapters on the results of the Moving in My World research project and, moreover, fills a significant gap in the current literatures in pedagogy, sport, health and visual methods. Centring on the notion of visual pedagogy, this text offers cutting-edge visual research in physical culture from a critical and theoretically informed perspective. To date, this is the only book that uses visual research to offer a pedagogical perspective on young people’s engagement with physical culture, gathering chapters on this topic from Europe, the USA and Australia. Bodies Out of Sight is another book proposal currently in preparation, which will gather findings from this research, and that I intend to submit to Policy Press.

Please see below the research output for this project, including articles, book chapters and books, published, in press or in progress. • Azzarito, L. & Kirk, D. (Eds.) (in preparation). Pedagogies, Physical Culture and Visual Methods. London: Routledge • Azzarito, L. (2010). Ways of seeing the body in kinesiology: A case for visual methodologies. Quest, 62, 155-170 • Azzarito, L., & Sterling J. (2010). “What it was in my eyes”: Picturing youths’ embodiment in ‘real’ spaces. Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, 2, 209-228. Special Edition on Visual Methods in Physical Culture • Azzarito, L. (2011). Young bodies; Vulnerable identities. In K. Armour (Ed.), Introduction to sport pedagogy for teachers and coaches. London: Routledge • Azzarito, L. (2011). “What it was in my eyes”: Picturing youths’ embodiment in ‘real’ spaces. In C. Phoenix & B. Smith, The world of physical culture in sport and exercise – Visual methods for qualitative research. London: Routledge. • Azzarito, L. (2011). Young people learning how to move in the world: The visual as a body pedagogy. Published at: http://www.physical-literacy.org.uk/keynote-azzarito-pl2011.pdf • Azzarito, L. (2011). “I’ve lost my football...” Rethinking gender(s), the hidden curriculum, and sport in the global context. In R. Bailey & S. Dagkas (Eds.), Sport for all? Exclusion from and through sport. London: Routledge • Azzarito, L. (in press). Digital photography as a pedagogical tool for investigating young people’s embodiment. Visual Studies • Azzarito, L. (in press). Girls looking for a “second home”: bodies, difference, and places of inclusion in girls’ eyes. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy

Because of word limit, please see below selected academic conferences through which impacts have been achieved. Keynote Presentations • Young people learning how to move in the world: The visual as a body pedagogy. Social and cultural dimensions of physical literacies, June 29, 2011. Keynote Lecture for International Conference on Physical Literacies, University of Bedforshire, UK Conference Presentations • Azzarito, L. (2012) Using digital photography to shed light on “bodies at risk” in physical culture. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the AERA, Vancouver, Canada. SIG-Qualitative Research • Azzarito, L. (2012) A visual inquiry into young people’s expressions of their embodiment. Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the AAHPERD, Research Consortium, Boston, MA • Moving in my world, July 2010. Association for Physical Education Annual Conference, Cotswold Water Park, UK • Photography as inquiry in pedagogy, April 2009. Research on Learning and Instruction in Physical Education SIG, AERA, San Diego, CA • Research, methodologies & new ways of knowing in physical education: Toward bricolage? April 2009. Research on Learning and Instruction in Physical Education SIG, AERA, San Diego, CA Conference Symposia Organised • Visual Methods and Identity Work, May 2012. International Congress for Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign • Visual Methods, Pedagogies & Young People, September 2011. BERA Conference, London • Physical Culture & Visual Methods, September 2010. The Social Life of Methods: ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) Conference, Oxford University, Oxford, UK

The research currently published, in press and in preparation will have an impact on researchers in kinesiology and also on researchers engaged in interdisciplinary physical culture studies. This research is especially likely to have an impact on scholars who work across disciplines, from PE pedagogy to physical culture studies, from visual studies and museum studies to women and gender studies. The edited book currently in preparation with Routledge, Pedagogies, Physical Culture and Visual Methods, when published, will nurture interdisciplinary visual research in PE pedagogy and physical culture by endorsing an interdisciplinary approach to research as adopted in the Moving in My World research project. This text will also contribute to researchers’, graduate students’ and educators’ understanding of the multifaceted dimensions of young people’s engagement with physical culture, and could make a contribution to researchers’ use of visual methodologies. It also could be suggested, that given the limited visual research on physical culture published in visual studies and education, this book, along with articles already published in peer-review academic journals, will impact novice and senior researchers in PE pedagogy and physical culture who are interested in visual research and critical issues of the body, expanding research in these fields.

The Moving in My World research project, instead of just “taking” from the research setting, centred the participants in the research process and allowed the outcomes of the research to remain in the community. To achieve this objective, photo exhibitions of students’ digital photographs were delivered at researched schools, community art centres (Figure 1 and 2) and at the New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, Leicester. As the intention of the Moving in My World exhibition was to make student-researchers’ embodied experiences visible to the public, these exhibitions served as a pedagogy (Hooper-Greenhill, 2008) for challenging reductive and negative notions of ethnic minority young people as “lazy” and “inactive”, and therefore, “at-risk”. The exhibitions opened a public dialogue about the multiple and complex ways young people construct the “active body”. In order to encourage student-researchers and their communities to come to the museum and the community art centre, the participants’ school communities, teachers, head teachers and peers were invited via postcard invitations, emails and posters (Figure 3). Invitations and advertisements were also disseminated within the university community, and through the New Walk Museum’s informal network in Leicester (e.g., coffee shops, libraries, shops). Reaching a broad audience was an important goal for the project, in order to centre the student-researchers in the research, and to make visible their views on the significance of physical activity in their daily lives. The visitors’ reactions to the exhibits at the Pedestrian Community Art Centre and at the New Walk Museum might be gauged from the positive comments gathered in exhibition comment books, as discussed in a chapter of the forthcoming book, Pedagogies, Physical Culture and Visual Methods.

The translational outputs that might have had a societal impact, including an impact on young people/participants, teachers and people in the researched community, are outlined below: • Press release “Leicester pupils catch physical activity on camera for new exhibition.” Press Release No: 10/101. June 29, 2010. Public Relations, Loughborough University • Moving in My World, Digital Photography Research-Related Exhibitions o Researched Schools. Exhibitions: 12 April–29 May, 2010 o Roots School-Based Arts Exhibition, DeMontfort University, Leicester, UK. Exhibition: 11 June–15 June, 2010 o Pedestrian Arts Centre, Leicester, UK. Exhibition: 1 July–6 July, 2010 o Social Life of Methods: ESRC Center for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) Conference, Oxford University, Oxford, UK. Exhibition 31 August–3 September 2010 o New Walk Museum & Art Gallery, Leicester, UK. Exhibition: 25 March–15 May 2011 o AIESEP International Conference, Limerick, Ireland. Exhibition: 22-25 June 2011 o AAHPERD International Conference, Boston, USA. (exhibition in progress) Please note that the book chapter entitled “The Moving in My World Project: A Museum Exhibition of Physical Culture for ‘Real People in Real Places’” written for Pedagogies, Physical Culture and Visual Methods examines the pedagogical and critical aspects of the museum exhibition organised as a result of this research (Figure 4).

For the Moving in My World research project, dissemination of findings and engagement with non-academic audiences were achieved through the organisation of school-based Moving in My World photo exhibitions, as well as through photo exhibitions at community-arts centres, museums and conferences for education professionals.

The Moving in My World exhibitions of words and photographs benefited the participants’ communities (e.g., student-researchers, their families, and schools) but also benefited the general public. The exhibitions provided a pedagogical space for the public to engage with teens’ inspiring ways of “seeing”, talking about, and reflecting upon the significance of physical activity in their everyday lives. The exhibition delivered at the New Walk Museum (March 2011) was also particularly beneficial to the Museum itself, supporting the Museum’s educational agenda to deliver exhibitions that “get closer to the public”, and the Leicester community. Comparing the Moving in My World exhibition to other exhibitions of sport which had been organized in the past at the New Walk Museum (e.g., Love Sport, which was an interactive exhibition for young people), a museum curator observed: I think it’s created a lot of interest because, you know there is a lot relatively quite a lot of comments in there (in the comment book) than what we usually get in an exhibition…it’s already got more comments in that comment book than I’ve seen in larger exhibitions here, so I think that shows that people have a real interest in it. I think it’s because it’s done in collaboration with, emm, by young people as well that’s what maybe spurs people on to make comments as well, particularly young people, they can relate to it. (book chapter in Azzarito, in preparation)

The potential scientific and societal impact of this research is explained above. The completion of this research may present a solid starting point from which to nurture visual research on young people’s engagement in physical culture and grow an international academic network on visual methods/research within and across disciplines.

To date, there has been no unexpected negative impact. There was unexpected but very positive feedback received from visitors to the Moving in My World exhibitions at the Pedestrian Community Art Centre and New Walk Museum. Visitors’ feedback from both exhibitions was recorded in exhibition notebooks.

To date, no major scientific difficulties have limited the scientific impact of this research.

The economic and societal impact is explained above.

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Azzarito, Laura. Moving in My World: An Investigation into Young People's Embodiment and its Impact on Participation in Physical Activity: ESRC Impact Report, RES-061-25-0382. Swindon: ESRC

Vancouver

Azzarito Laura. Moving in My World: An Investigation into Young People's Embodiment and its Impact on Participation in Physical Activity: ESRC Impact Report, RES-061-25-0382. Swindon: ESRC.