Skills and Employment Survey (SES)

ESRC is co-funding a Skills and Employment Survey(SES) with the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), to be carried out across Britain in 2012 of people aged 20-65 in paid employment. The survey focuses upon the work that people do and how working life has changed over time. The 2012 survey builds upon previous ESRC funded studies and continues a series that began in 1986. The survey will provide a link between the previous Skills based and Employment based surveys in the series. It is anticipated that approximately 3,170 respondents will take part in the 2012 survey.

The survey will set a benchmark for future research in the field and become a key and distinctive resource for research on contemporary working life. The survey will also allow some contemporary international comparison with similar surveys held in other countries.

Stemming from this overarching aim, there are four further objectives to be addressed:

  • describe and analyse the level and distribution of skills requirements of jobs in British workplaces in 2012 and compare these patterns with earlier data points
  • similarly, describe and analyse the level and distribution of key aspects of workers’ experiences of their jobs in 2012, and compare with earlier data points
  • use the data to develop three distinctive original and substantive contributions to scholarship surrounding job quality and job skill
  • make the data available and provide the necessary data support and infrastructure for further analyses by academic or policy-based researchers in the field of skills and job quality.

It is anticipated that the Survey team will hold an initial results event in early 2013 and at least 3 papers will be published, further information to follow.

Further information

The project is being led by Professor Alan Felstead (Cardiff School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University), who is also Visiting Professor at the LLAKES Centre, Institute of Education, London, which is co-hosting the project. Other members of the research team are: Professor Francis Green (LLAKES, Institute of Education, London); Professor Duncan Gallie (Nuffield College, Oxford); and Hande Inanc (Nuffield College, Oxford).